NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville... Capturing Warehouse Efficiencies through CPI Project

March 7, 2014 | By scnewsltr
 The Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP) Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville Detachment Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC) Mayport, Fla., team recently conducted a Continuous Process Improvement (CPI) project focused on capturing warehouse material storage capacity.  The FLC Jacksonville team is a cross functional cadre of experts embedded at SERMC that directly supports the warfighter and the fleet by providing all aspects of Integrated Logistics (IL) services to support mission related operations and functions for Naval Station Mayport, Fla. - based Navy vessels, as well as numerous visiting ships. [caption id="attachment_1881" align="alignright" width="300"]
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VIRIN: 190906-N-XZ219-0036
Wilbur "Wil" Lynch, NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville Detachment SERMC Supervisory Material Handler, transports a pallet full of NAVSEA Sponsor Owned Material (SOM) from its accommodation storage location during the wall to wall inventory conducted during the Warehouse Space Availability Continuous Process Improvement (CPI) project One of the major logistics services that the team provides is the receipt, inspection, and accommodation storage of Government Furnished Material (GFM), Contractor Furnished Material (CFM), and Sponsor Owned Material (SOM) at the detachment’s warehouse site before turnover to the Alteration Installation Team (AIT), or to the Waterfront Operations Maintenance Team.  Ultimately, the material stored in the site’s warehouse is transferred and used to accomplish repairs and modernization for ships’ scheduled Dry-docking Selected Restricted Availability (DSRA), Selected Restricted Availability (SRA), Continuous Maintenance Availability (CMAV), and emergent work performed during an unscheduled Window of Opportunity (WOO). With the recent changing of the Patrol Craft, USS Shamal (PC 13), USS Zepher (PC 8), and USS Tornado (PC 14) homeports to Naval Station Mayport, determining warehousing space availability became a primary focal point for the SERMC team.  Furthermore, with future Navy plans including the homeport change for an Amphibious Ready Group (ARG), the USS New York (LPD 21) arriving in December, and the USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43) and the USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) in 2014, the team questioned whether or not there was adequate available space to accommodate additional material storage required to support the increase in ship repair and modification schedules.  Geared to provide superior customer support, the SERMC team proactively enlisted the help of NAVSUP CPI Blackbelt Ricky Toups to jumpstart the CPI project designed to capture the current warehousing operational footprint.  From the initial onset of the project, the team faced some distinctive challenges including resource restraints and an austere fiscal environment.  To help alleviate resource challenges, the team developed a detailed plan of action which called for NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville personnel, SERMC resources, along with the assistance of Navy drilling reservists.  “Our team was able to make necessary staffing adjustments required for the project, by bringing in Naval Reserve sailors to assist with conducting some of the work-heavy tasks including a detailed wall to wall inventory,” explained NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville Detachment Site Director, Lt. Cmdr. Paul Havens.  With the help of the Navy Reservists, the team was able to successfully conduct an in-depth analysis which established a baseline inventory, helped identify areas for process improvement as well as opportunities to reconcile discrepancies caused due to varying record keeping methodologies.  Furthermore, as part of the project’s “measure” phase, the team was able to capture other critical statistics including the current quantity and length of time that parts were being stored at the customer’s request.  These results included the capturing of an average GFM stock turn rate of about four years, with SOM stock turn rates averaging about 1.33 years during the 24-month threshold.  During the “analyze” phase of the project, final inventory numbers showed that of the 1,127 fixed storage locations; about 532 or 45 percent of the locations were empty, thus proving warehousing capacity to be adequate for any increased ship repair and modification workload.  In order to enhance customer support and to help eliminate future inventory discrepancies and inconsistencies, the team successfully established clear business rules for all receipted material.  Furthermore, the team developed a database tool that allows for increased material visibility, as well as quick and accurate identification of storage capacity.  Both of the above solutions were identified during a brainstorming session of the process “improvement” phase of the project.  “The database tool that the team developed has many benefits that can help influence customer decisions regarding disposition of material with above average stock turn rates,” Lt. Cmdr. Havens emphasized.  Furthermore, to help expedite and plan for ship repairs, SERMC personnel, including planners and managers, were granted access to the database tool, which will also allow the reallocation of material not being used for future ship repairs, thus leading to future cost avoidance due to being able to manage on-hand material. With regards to the success of the CPI project, Lt. Cmdr. Havens said, “The conduction of the wall to wall inventory and the creation of the Access database helped to provide increased visibility of end-use assets.  It also allowed us to drive enhancements and efficiencies in our warehousing processes as well as the opportunity to further enhance our commitment to providing world class support to the fleet, while being the best possible stewards of NAVSEA owned parts, and taxpayer money.”  

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