OPERATING WITHIN “THE NETWORK” … PACFLT N4 Leveraging the Logistics Naval Support Network

Aug. 17, 2015 | By scnewsltr
Simply stated, the global logistics network is a logistics system of systems, encompassing all of the current DOD systems as well as our industry and agency partner’s systems. So who’s “in the network?” [caption id="attachment_3097" align="alignleft" width="300"]
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VIRIN: 150817-N-XZ219-0095
The Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) escorts the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) as they pass the Rock of Gibraltar while transiting the Strait of Gibraltar. U.S. Navy photo by MCSN Anthony Hopkins II As supply professionals, we understand that under the Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP) umbrella exist NAVSUP Weapon Systems Support, NAVSUP Business Systems Center, NAVSUP Global Logistics Support (with its NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Centers (FLC)) and Navy Exchange Service Command … all of which play vital roles in providing logistics and quality-of-life support to Navy customers. We also probably know that under the big Navy umbrella we have Systems Commands/Program Executive Offices; Fleet/Type Commanders; and Commander, Navy Installations Command. The network operates globally, so our Joint and sister service organizations and commands like U.S. Transportation Command and Defense Logistics Agency are easily identifiable as contributing members of the network and we benefit from the presence of embedded Supply Corps personnel. What you may not have known is that the network is vast and includes entities such as General Services Administration, the United Postal Service, Coalition partners and commercial partners … many of which do not have presence in the Navy Supply Team, but by the nature of their support to maritime forces, and the flow of information and material are in “the network.” All of these entities collaborate to meet the needs of the warfighter while operating within a set of accepted business rules facilitated by the network. The U.S. Pacific Fleet mission, to protect and defend the maritime interests of the United States in the Indo-Asia Pacific region, relies heavily on the entities comprising the Global Logistics Network. The N4 plays a vital role in that mission as the Director for Logistics, Fleet Supply and Ordnance. An agile and talented directorate comprised of 24 Active/Reserve component Officers/Enlisted and 20 Government Service (GS) or civilian contractors, the N4 staff uniquely represents every category comprising the global logistics network; NAVSUP, Navy, commercial partners, and Joint/Coalition/National partners. We enjoy a transparent Reserve component integration, along with a strong ADDU relationship with NAVSUP FLC Pearl Harbor for logistics planning and fuels expertise (including two OPLOG interns) PACAF Logistics Common Operating Picture (LOGCOP) Programmers, DLA LNO and one Royal Australian Navy LNO. The N4 has four major sub directorates; Logistics Planning (N40), Fleet Supply (N41), Ordnance Logistics (N42) and Logistics Readiness Center/Current Operations and Port Visit Management (N4C). All sub directorates rely heavily on collaboration, products and services provided by those in the global logistics network. Whether it’s operational logistics planning, operational contracting support, forward stock positioning decisions, movement of theater ordnance, Maritime Operations Center (MOC) involvement, port visit management or exercise logistics support, PACTFLT N4 is postured to support the Commander in being a combat-ready Fleet, able to respond to any contingency when called. In order to be “ready to fight tonight”, there are numerous challenges to overcome as a nation and Navy in this highly operational, geographically vast and unique area of responsibility. The reliance on the global logistics network underpins mission success and allows PACFLT N4 to be the logistics voice to the fleet. By CAPT J.D. Cassani, PACFLT Deputy Director, Logistics, Fleet Supply and Ordnance