MESA Students Take Day-Long Trip to D.C.

May 14, 2013 | By scnewsltr
     Students with the Pennsylvania Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement (MESA)’s Mobile Apps team at Temple University participated in a day-long trip to Washington D.C., involving Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) activities on March 27.      Since the February 2012 signing of an official Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between Temple University and NAVSUP Weapon Systems Support (WSS), the two organizations have continued to grow their partnership ,which has included the development of a logistics-based math course now known as Logistics, Acquisitions and Supply Systems Operations (LASSO).  Students currently taking LASSO courses are starting to work on Mobile Apps that may one day assist U.S. military veterans. [caption id="attachment_836" align="alignleft" width="224"]
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VIRIN: 130514-N-ZZ219-0836
Students with the Pennsylvania Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement (MESA)’s Mobile Apps team at Temple University gather in front of the White House during their visit to Washington D.C. involving Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) activities on March 27. (Photo by MESA parent Mr. Curtis Ball)      "STEM proficient students are essential to fueling the workforce of tomorrow,” explained Rear Adm. Mark Heinrich, Commander, Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP) and Chief of Supply Corps.  “Kids who can answer complex questions, investigate global issues, and develop solutions for challenges and real-world problems are the kids who will become the best and brightest military and industry leaders of tomorrow.”      "STEM integrates students in the same ways industry professionals work together, learning from each others' ideas and benefitting from diverse perspectives," he added.      “We are partnering to achieve two very important outcomes,” said Dr. Jamie Bracey, director of the Pennsylvania MESA.  “The first is a stronger talent pool of American students pursuing degrees and careers that require math and computational thinking.  The second is a deeper, broader understanding of the global impact of the U.S. Navy, leading to persistence qualifying for one of the most technologically advanced institutions in the world.” By Margaret Kenyon-Ely, Naval Supply Systems Command Public Affairs