Yokosuka Contracts Team Seeks to Simplify the Small Acquisition Process with Biennial Training

BY TINA C. STILLIONS, DIRECTOR OF CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS
AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS, NAVSUP FLEET LOGISTICS CENTER YOKOSUKA

Contracts professionals at NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Yokosuka held biennial simplified acquisition procedures (SAP) training, April 11, 2017.

With close to 100 people in attendance, the primary audience for the event included commands and activities that NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka delegates procurement authority, such as government-wide commercial purchase card holders; those with ordering authority; and customers with SAP responsibility.

Bret Wood, Procurement Performance Management Assessment Program and sites division director for NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka.

“Some of the presentations we had were based on Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR), the Department of Defense supplement, as well as NAVSUP instructions. But other information was applicable to all personnel utilizing simplified acquisition procedures,” said Bret Wood, Procurement Performance Management Assessment Program and sites division director.

“We had a great turnout from across Commander Fleet activities and the overall response from attendees was positive,” said Wood.

Presentations during the two-day training event covered such topics as blanket purchase agreements, contract modifications, unauthorized commitments, government purchase card training and ethics. Presenters from the General Service Administration and Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) also spoke on their areas of expertise.

NCIS took part to educate the Department of the Navy (DoN) community about the dangers that fraud presents.

“Whether it’s product substitution, corruption, or taking bribes, fraud endangers our service men and women and negatively affects the DoN’s capital investments,” said Special Agent Marco Tirado, economic crimes representative for the NCIS Far East Field Office.

NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka Commanding Officer Capt. Jeff Davis

“We work a lot of product substitution cases in which inferior parts are sold in place of the quality components ordered. For example, if one of the cheap parts ends up being used for helicopter maintenance and it fails, the consequences could be deadly. That’s why we always encourage our audiences to be on the lookout for fraud and to report it to us,” said Tirado.

Formerly referred to as “small purchase,” SAP is a method of procurement described in the FAR for the acquisition of supplies and services including construction, research and development, and commercial items.

The aggregate amount should not exceed the simplified acquisition threshold, which is generally $150,000; however, the FAR does permit SAP acquisitions up to $6.5 million for commercial supplies and services.

In order to help prevent some of the unauthorized and potentially fraudulent activities that can be associated with SAP, the contracts team at NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka developed the two-day event.

Wood said they will continue offering the training to the acquisition community and fleet.

“We will continue the biennial training and will certainly incorporate any new guidance that we receive for the future sessions,” he said. “Knowledge is power and this kind of training is a vital component in relaying important information about changes to instructions and guidance.”

“My hope is that it might also mitigate any improper, negligent or unauthorized procurements,” said Wood.

July/August 2017